Saturday, July 26, 2014

3 Types of Experiential Customers

Unevolved Brand #95
The great thing about experiential marketing is that it allows consumers to become active participants in the marketing effort and a brand gets to interact with the consumer directly, face-to-face. A new stat says 78% of millennials are more inclined to become part of a brand if they experience the face-to-face interaction of experiential marketing. There are three challenging experiential customers: the non-loyalist, the independent spirit, and the tastemakers.
The Non-Loyalist
AKA:
Sample Queens

Usually hear them saying:
“Ooooh samples!” or “I’ll try anything if it’s free.”



Challenge:
Non-loyalists are focused on one thing and one thing only, the deal. This consumer will always take the brand-name price leader and will always be looking for the best transaction for their money. They are price sensitive, undeterred by fancy packaging, and unimpressed with new features or claims. This segment spans across all demographics, from baby boomers to millennials and from moms to college students. How does a company interject their more expensive, less familiar product into a non-loyalists attention?

What do I do?
Play to the main strength of Non-Loyalists: knowledge of the product market. Show these consumers that you’ve considered it from their point of view; give them an honest comparison to your competitors. This transparency will gain loyalty as well as forcing the consumer to compare products on more levels than price. The Non-Loyalist is already willing to interact experiential marketing opportunities, the only task left is to display why your brand is the best value, with out a doubt.

The Independent Spirit
AKA:
Too Cool For School

Usually hear them saying:
“I liked it before it was mainstream.”

Challenge:
There’s an odd challenge of balance within this consumer group. Once a brand tries to reach a larger experiential audience, the Independent Spirits have lost interest. With out an undiscovered aura, the Independent Spirits will move on to the next underground brand. How do you retain the attention of these consumers while avoiding exclusivity?

What do I do?
The Independent Spirits pride themselves on being the authority of a brand, so treat them as so. Experiential marketing is a perfect match for this group of consumers because they thrive on being sought out and sharing involvement in the process. Independent Spirits have an opinion, cater to that and show them preference to the every-day consumer. When a company shows that it’s initial qualities that bound the Independent Spirit are still in the core of the brand and that you are offering them exclusive experiences as authorities, they will continue to be your die hard fans.

The Tastemakers
AKA:
Early adopters

Where you can find them:
First in line for the iPhone 6 at their local Apple store

Challenge:
Though Tastemakers and Independent Spirits seem similar (which they are), there are a few key differences. Tastemakers love innovation and will pay more to have the product first. The main difference is that Tastemakers live for being ahead of the curve. The challenge comes when a company is deciding how to distinguish itself when the product is second to market or one of many options.

What do I do?
Ideally, every company’s roster would be full of market-leading brands, but this is not always the case. The truth: oftentimes the most innovative and exciting experiential marketing programs come from smaller brands. This is because the market leaders don’t need to take risks, aren’t always driven to push the envelope. Smaller brands start to understand the importance of blurring lines between a product and marketing campaigns. This creates a halo effect that takes you farther than products alone could. These consumers demand companies that push the limit and find pride in tagging along. In order to woo the Tastemaker, give them something no one else is in a brand.


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